Creating Space for Civic Conversations: Past, Present, & Future

Believing every citizen should be a student, I work to sustain and preserve our civic heritage for the next generation.

Research

Research

I am interested in the intersection of religion and politics, questions of national identity and citizenship, and the development of the American political tradition, broadly understood.

Teaching

Teaching

I use an interdisciplinary approach to teaching, drawing on my background in public history to incorporate material and visual culture in order to help students appreciate the connection between ideas and "real life."

Public Humanities

Public Humanities

I am co-director of the Religion in American History Project of the Ashbrook Center, where our goal is to better equip secondary educators to teach about religion in American history.

I am a Fellow at the Ashbrook Center at Ashland University, where I serve with David Tucker as a General Editor on the Core Document Collections and as co-director of the Center’s Religion in American History project. I am also an alumna of and instructor in the Master of Arts in American History and Government (MAHG) program housed in the Ashbrook Center.

My teaching and research focus on the intersection of religion and politics in American history, with an emphasis on questions of civic formation in sustaining political commitments. I am deeply interested in the use of material culture and visual culture as sources for understanding the development of American political thought. This is a reflection of my years in the field of public history where I have focused on helping students of all ages to see that objects and images can communicate as well as texts.

A native New Jerseyan, I am proud to have received my Ph.D. in Political Science from Rutgers University.

 

Our national character depends upon the character of each individual citizen. I provide historical perspective on the enduring challenge of translating fundamental civic principles into workable political and social practices.